Iain Clark (iainjclark) wrote,
Iain Clark
iainjclark

Oh god he's talking about politics

I'm not really a Nick Robinson fan, but this slightly smug, waffly article summarises the obvious difficulty in talking knowledgeably about our future in or out of Europe. There are probably many reasons to leave the EU. There are many reasons to stay. Probably neither will be a disaster (though what do I know?) but amid the patent fear-mongering on all sides there's genuine inability to know what will happen until it happens. The many leaflets that have thumped onto my doormat are equally aggravating whether they are for or against EU membership; although on the plus side they're all pleasingly shiny and ideal for lining the cat litter tray.

I also don't like Mr Cameron or his tax affairs, but as with his support for gay marriage I do occasionally find that he deigns to agree with me. It's nice of him, I only wish he'd do it more often. I do worry that the meta-narrative about political machinations within the Conservative party - Boris and IDS making tactical moves, Cameron's future, whether tax payers should pay for Government leaflets - is a sly and effective distraction from the real issues. Journalists don't do it on purpose, but they just can't resist shop talk. A story about a story is so much more gossipy than a story about an actual thing. It's fine when there's nothing much at stake but right now there are bigger fish to fry. (There would be smaller fish to fry, but they're subject to a strict EU fishing quota). If this becomes a story about politics then people will treat it as a political issue. They'll vote 'Out' to punish Cameron, rather than because they have a view on the EU.

Personally I'm for staying in. You're amazed, I can tell. It's not because I feel 'European', really. Intellectually I know I'm European, but it's not my primary national identity. 'Europe' still intuitively means "that big bit of continent over there" and not "this little collection of islands that the BBC weather map persists in tipping at an alarming angle so that Scotland looks tiny".

But neither do I feel any animosity towards Europe. I like the idea of being part of something greater. I guess I don't know any different. I've pretty much always *been* part of it, and Europe hasn't blighted my life with its evil foreign ways. Mais non. I think it's quite telling that you can watch an episode of 'Yes, Minister' from 1981 and hear the exact same stereotypical worries about the EU and its alleged wacky laws. But here we are 35 years later and the sky hasn't fallen and Britain hasn't lost its Britishness. Far from it. If we really must define Britishness as a test of cultural purity then we're more pugnaciously xenophobia than we have been in years. Well done, British people.

But really, what do we mean by Britishness? Boris is no less Boris for 40 years spent in the EU. It hasn't made Iain Duncan Smith any less strident. I reject the seductive notion that Europe erodes our "sovereignty" - whatever that really means - as if any country can govern in perfect isolation from its neighbours and treaties and trade alliances and human migration and equality and rights for workers and basic human rights. Of course not. We have sovereignty over our own laws in every way that counts; we don't seem to have any difficulty in passing laws that tax the homeless for their spare pavement. We simply subscribe to international common principles - both within the EU and in parallel with it - because it makes sense.

It's very easy to talk about isolationism in terms that make it sound noble and patriotic. You can picture Jim Hacker drifting into his Churchill impression. But Churchill was an architect of a United Europe, and I think it's a very grown-up, civilised thing to be part of a wider society of nations. We can be ourselves and still accept that there are limits on the way you can behave and still get to participate in the world. There's no reason I can see to feel that being part of Europe diminishes us. It might even make us greater.
Tags: current affairs, politics
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